The rights of the reader (#0991GS2)

by Pennac, Daniel; illustrated by Blake, Quentin

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3 reviews & awards | 3 full-text reviews

Paperback Candlewick Press, 2015
Price: USD 6.99
Description: 165 pages : illustrations ; 20 cm
Dewey: 028; Int Lvl: YA


 


Overview
From Follett

Translation of: Comme un roman. "Drawing on his experiences as a child, a parent, and an inner-city teacher, Pennac reflects on the power of story and on how we learn to read: what helps us and what gets in the way. He reminds us of our right to read anything, anywhere, at any time--as long as we are enjoying ourselves."--Back cover.

From the Publisher
"Joyful ode to reading...quirky, playful sketches to complement the author's engaging prose. Passionate and witty." -- BOOKLIST

First published in 1992 and even more relevant now, Daniel Pennac's quirky ode to reading has sold more than a million copies in his native France. Drawing on his experiences as a child, a parent, and an inner-city teacher in Paris, the author reflects on the power of story and reminds us of our right to read anything, anywhere, anytime, so long as we are enjoying ourselves. In a new translation with a foreword and illustrations by Quentin Blake, here is a guide to reading unlike any other: fresh,
sympathetic, and never didactic, it is a work of literature in its own right.

Product Details
  • Publisher: Candlewick Press
  • Publication Date: August 4, 2015
  • Format: Paperback
  • Edition: First U.S. paperback edition 2015.
  • Dewey: 028
  • Classifications: Nonfiction
  • Description: 165 pages : illustrations ; 20 cm
  • Tracings: Blake, Quentin, illustrator, contributor.
  • ISBN-10: 0-7636-7701-9
  • ISBN-13: 978-0-7636-7701-5
  • Follett Number: 0991GS2
  • Interest Level: YA

Reviews & Awards
  • Booklist, 10/15/08
  • Horn Book Magazine starred, 05/01/09
  • Kirkus Reviews starred, 10/01/08

Full-Text Reviews
Booklist (October 15, 2008 (Vol. 105, No. 4))
Grades 9-12. First published in 1992, this new translation of French author Pennac’s joyful ode to reading features an introduction by illustrator Quentin Blake, who also contributes quirky, playful sketches to complement the author’s engaging prose. Passionate and witty, Pennac draws upon his experiences as a child, parent, and inner-city teacher in Paris to espouse insightful declarations and reflections about the power of story. Pennac criticizes parents who do not nourish the enthusiasm their children have for reading, chastises educators who suck out the joy of the written word, and laments how our consumer culture reduces the book to a mere product—and he manages to do all of this without sounding didactic. Pennac closes the book by elaborating on his well-known 10 “rights of the reader.” Interest in this book among teens is likely to be limited, but those who share Pennac’s passion for reading will find it affirming.

Read all 3 full-text reviews …


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