If you hopped like a frog (#22403J6)

by Schwartz, David M; illustrated by Warhola, James

6 reviews & awards | 1 full-text review

Hardcover Scholastic Press, 1999
Price: USD 16.03
Description: 29 unnumbered pages : color illustrations ; 29 cm
Dewey: 513.2; Int Lvl: K-3; Rd Lvl: 3.2
AR 3.4 LG .5 2482EN; RC 2.5 2; LEX AD740L


 


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Overview
From Follett

Introduces the concept of ratio by comparing what humans would be able to do if they had bodies like different animals.


Product Details
  • Publisher: Scholastic Press
  • Publication Date: September 1, 1999
  • Format: Hardcover
  • Edition: 1st ed.
  • Dewey: 513.2
  • Classifications: Nonfiction
  • Description: 29 unnumbered pages : color illustrations ; 29 cm
  • Tracings: Warhola, James, illustrator.
  • ISBN-10: 0-590-09857-8
  • ISBN-13: 978-0-590-09857-1
  • LCCN: 98-046546
  • Follett Number: 22403J6
  • Catalog Number: 0590098578
  • Interest Level: K-3
  • Reading Level: 3.2
  • ATOS Book Level: 3.4
  • AR Interest Level: LG
  • AR Points: .5
  • AR Quiz: 2482EN
  • Reading Counts Level: 2.5
  • Reading Counts Points: 2
  • Lexile: AD740L

Reviews & Awards
  • Appraisal: Science Books for Young People, 06/01/01
  • Book Links, 11/01/04
  • Booklist, 11/15/99
  • Bulletin of the Center for Children's Books, 12/01/99
  • Publishers Weekly, 08/30/99
  • School Library Journal, 11/01/99

Full-Text Reviews
Booklist (Vol. 96, No. 6 (November 15, 1999))
Ages 5-9. Schwartz, the author of How Much Is a Million? (1985), tackles ratio and proportion and once again shows the same knack for wowing his audience with plain facts stated in startling ways. Here he uses images from the animal kingdom to dramatize ideas of proportion: "If you were as strong as an ANT . . . you could lift a car!" and "If you high-jumped like a FLEA . . . you could land on Lady Liberty's torch!" Warhola's pleasing, colorful paintings make the most of the visual humor inherent in the images. Although the main text is quite short, the last few pages discuss each marvel in more detail and show the ratio used to calculate it. Instantly appealing, this picture book makes its subject accessible by taking the fear out of it. A welcome addition to classroom units on proportion.

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